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INGREDIENTS:

Oseltamivir phosphate 75 mg capsule12 capsules
Ora-Sweet SFQSAD: 60 mL

EQUIPMENT AND SUPPLIES:

Powder containment hood, ceramic mortar and pestle, graduated cylinder

PREPARATION DETAILS:

  1. Open capsules and empty contents into a mortar.

  2. Triturate contents to a fine powder.

  3. Levigate powder with a small amount of vehicle to form a paste.

  4. Add vehicle in increasing amounts while mixing thoroughly.

  5. Transfer contents of the mortar to a graduated cylinder.

  6. Rinse the mortar and pestle with vehicle and pour into graduated cylinder.

  7. Add vehicle to the graduated cylinder to achieve the total volume indicated above.

  8. Transfer contents of the graduated cylinder into an appropriately sized amber bottle.

  9. Shake well to mix.

Alternatives — May substitute vehicle with cherry syrup. Stable for 35 days when refrigerated and 5 days when stored at room temperature. Also may substitute using SyrSpend SF, which is stable for 90 days when refrigerated, or SyrSpend SF (for reconstitution), which is stable for 30 days when refrigerated.

Quality-Control Procedures — Visually inspect for physical appearance of formulation and container closure integrity (no leakage, cracks in container, or improper seals).

Labeling Requirements — Extemporaneously compounded preparation. For oral use only. Store at room temperature or refrigerate. Shake well before use.

Storage Conditions/Stability — Store at room temperature or refrigerate. Stable for 35 days.

STABILITY STUDY DETAILS:

Study Container Type — Amber glass bottle and amber polyethylene terephthalate (PET) bottle with plastic cap1; low-actinic plastic prescription bottle2

Referenced Manufacturers — Oseltamivir phosphate capsules (Tamiflu, Roche Laboratories, Inc); Ora-Sweet SF (Paddock Laboratories, LLC); cherry syrup (Humco).1 Oseltamivir phosphate capsules (Tamiflu, Roche Laboratories, Inc); cherry syrup, SyrSpend SF, SyrSpend SF (for reconstitution) (Gallipot).2

Stability-Indicating Study — Yes

Commercially available as a 6-mg/mL suspension — Use extemporaneously prepared formulation only when commercial product is unavailable or a more concentrated syrup is desired.

REFERENCES

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    Winiarski AP, Infeld MH, Tscherne R, et al.Preparation and stability of extemporaneous oral liquid formulations of oseltamivir using commercially available capsules. J Am Pharm Assoc. 2007;47(6):747755.

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    Voudrie MA 2nd, Allen DB. Stability of oseltamivir phosphate in SyrSpend SF, cherry syrup and SyrSpend SF (for reconstitution). Int J Pharm Compd. 2010;14:8285.

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    Dijkers E, Nanhekhan V, Thorissen A. Updated stability data of midazolam, oseltamivir phosphate, and propranolol hydrochloride in SyrSpend SF and minoxidil in Espumil. Int J Pharm Compd. 2017;21(3):240241.

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