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A

Academia, 324

Academic dishonesty, 385–386, 389–390

Academy of Managed Care Pharmacy, 322, 325

Accountable care organizations, 327

Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education (ACPE), 4

accreditation standards for, 50, 409

accreditation standards guidance 22.2, 297–299

administration rotation and, 180

affiliation agreements and, 28

APPE curriculum and, 140

APPE transitions of care and, 254–255

Center for the Advancement of Pharmacy Education outcomes, 50

continuing professional development and, 14–15

core competencies and, 6

experiential education and, 287

Experiential Quality Assurance standard of, 161

feedback and, 425

pharmacy programs and, 204–205

preceptor appointments and, 439–440

preceptor assessment and, 440–441

preceptor attributes and, 439

preceptor criteria for, 438

preceptor preparation and, 440

preceptor training programs by, 303

preceptors of students and, 348–349

rotations and, 179

self-assessment instrument of, 441

Standard 20 of, 437–438

Standard 20 guidance and, 437–438

Standard 20.3 of, 117

Standards 12, 13 of, 138

student:preceptor ratios and, 438–439

teaching aptitude and, 439

workshops by, 330

Accreditation standards, 437. see also specific accrediting bodies

Action Collaborative on Clinician Well-Being and Resilience, 360–361

Acute care/inpatient, administration of, 173

Adherence, 249

Adjunct faculty appointments, 284

Administration acute care/inpatient, 173

ambulatory care, 174

business of pharmacy, 174–175

careers in, 181

clinical programs, 173–174

corporate health systems, 177

data analytics, 177

finance, 175–176

formulary management, 175

patient satisfaction, 176–177

pharmacy information systems, 177–178

purchasing/supply chain, 175

revenue cycle, 177

sterile products, 173

strategic planning, 176

value-based purchasing, 176–177

Administration rotation learner and, 181

organization and, 180–181

preceptor and, 181

Administrative staff, learner education responsibilities, 165

Advanced education, 329–330

Advanced pharmacy practice experiences (APPEs), 2, 52, 128, 133

AACP and, 134

American Pharmacists Association and, 134

American Society of Consultant Pharmacists and, 134

curriculum of, 4

developing, 154–155

direct patient care and, 134–136

English as a second language and, 405

experiential education hours and, 204, 287

experiential education standards for, 101

experiential requirements, by state, 210–219

healthy professional attitude influence during, 137

independent practitioner encouragement during, 136–137

interpersonal skills and, 138–139

longer practice experiences and, 194

organization, time management and, 137

pharmaceutical care/disease management and, 134–136

professional growth, scholarly development during, 138

professional skills and, 133

specialty camps and, 134

student activities examples on, 133

student schedule sample for, 187, 188

teaching others and, 138

transitions of care and, 254–255, 256

Advanced training, 327–328

Affective learning, 110, 111

education methods for, 112

Affiliation agreements 28–29, 281–282

elements of, 29

Affordable Care Act, 230, 231

federally qualified health centers and, 232

health home and, 232

prevention through, 232–233

African American, 234, 235

Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, 362

universal medication schedule and, 251

Agreement, 282

Alaska Native, 234

Albumin, 239

Allen, David, 172

Ambulatory care pharmacy, 321

American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy (AACP) APPE and, 134

Center for the Advancement of Pharmacy Education (CAPE) outcomes, 4, 5

core entrusted professional activities, 4–5, 120, 121

diversification and, 396

entrustable professional activities and, 195–197

Master Preceptor Recognition by, 64

percentage of degrees conferred by ethnicity/race 2017, 397

percentage of degrees conffered by gender 2017, 396

preceptor professional development and, 290

preceptor and student responsibilities, 295

student affairs and, 363

student self-identity and, 401, 402

American Association on Health and Disability, 246

American College of Clinical Pharmacy (ACCP), 325

fellowship programs and, 343

residency training and, 339

student professionalism and, 265

American College of Healthcare Executives, 333–334

American College of Surgeons, 362

American Community Survey (2012) table R1810 of, 247

American Indian, 234

American Pharmaceutical Association, rotations, 141

American Pharmacists Association (APhA), 325

Advanced Preceptor Training and, 64

APPE and, 134

Code of Ethics of, 73, 410–411

American Society for Quality, 161

American Society of Consultant Pharmacists, 325

APPE and, 134

American Society of Health-System Pharmacists (ASHP), 325

accountable care organizations and, 327

accreditation standards of, 139, 333, 348, 428

administration rotation and, 180

ambulatory care and, 329

APPE and, 134

Commission on Credentialing, 282, 340–341

feedback and, 425

Foundation Pharmacy Forecast, 339–340

generational differences and, 399

learner interaction and, 65

mentor match program of, 317

Midyear clinical meeting, tools for students, 352–354

Objective R3.2.4, 384

PGY1 standard, 170–171

PGY1 transitions of care, 256

Pharmacy Forecast, 176

Pharmacy Practice Model Initiative, 16

Practice Advancement Initiative (2015), 183–184

practice model and, 186

preceptor attributes and, 442

preceptor plan and, 303

Preceptor Toolkit, 64

residency accreditation, 117

Residency Matching Program, 355

residency training and, 328

rotations and, 141

Standards for Residency Program Accreditation, 441–442

Statement of Professionalism, 264

American Society of Quality, 163

Americans with Disabilities Act, 245

Americans with Disabilities: 2010, 247

Annual Perspective on Burnout (2015), 362

Arkansas State Board of Pharmacy requirement, 203–204

Armed Services, 325

Articulation, 115

Ashby, Harvey, 185, 186

Asian, 234–235

Assessment, 50

case presentation for, 42

competency-based, 41

course map example of, 50

direct observation, 42

formal methods of, 42

formative, 51

journal article critique and, 42

realistic, 51

recognizable, 51

reflection/portfolio, 42

relevant (valid), 51

reliable, 51

rubric, 41–42

scoring guide for, 41

SOAP note and, 42

summative, 51

tools for, 50

types of, 51

Association for Experiential Education (AEE), 101–103

Association of Health Care Journalists Annual Meeting, 359–360

Audits, 179

Autonomy, 360, 364

Awards, 284

B

Baby Boomers, 397

characteristics of, 398

Bearman, Margaret, 377

Best practices for development, 442

for orientation, 442

for recruitment, 442

for retention, 442–443

Bisexual, 243

Black, 234, 235

Block scheduling, 186, 187

Bloom’s taxonomy, 110–113

affective learning, 110, 111, 112

cognitive learning, 110–111, 112

psychomotor learning, 111–112

Board of Pharmaceutical Specialties, 332

Brief Health Literacy Screening, 250

Burnout, 359

case example of, 378

evidence of, 361–362

medical errors and, 362

Business plans, administration of, 178

C

Capsule formulations, 239

Career advising, 313

Career advising charting course in, 313–315

Career planning additional support for, 334

personal mission statement and, 317

preceptor’s role in, 315–317

professional organization involvement and, 317–318

Career reflection activity, 92

Careers in pharmacy, 318–319

academia and research, 324

accountable care organizations, 327

ambulatory care, 321

common opportunities for, 319

community, 321–322

contract research organizations, 326

employee benefit counseling, 325–326

government, 325

group purchasing organizations, 326

healthcare information technology, 326–327

health-system, 319–321

home infusion, 323–324

managed care, 322–323

medical homes, 327

medical marketing, communication organizations, 326

pharmaceutical and healthcare distributors, 326

pharmaceutical industry, 324

professional associations, 325

specialty, 323

Center for Advancement of Pharmacy Education Domains 2, 3, 255

outcomes and, 120

Center for Generational Studies, 399

Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS), 176

prescription drug spending and, 322

Certification, 332–334

programs, 32

Chan, Sharif, 424

Children’s Health Insurance Program, 229

Cisgender, 243

Citigroup “Workforce and Talent” document, 40–41

Civil Rights Act of 1964, 403

Cleveland Clinic, 186

Cleveland Clinic Florida, 192

Clinical care ladders, 327–328

Clinical programs, administration of, 173–174

Clinical service development, 285

Clinical student interns, 187, 189

Coaching, 65, 115, 345

Code of Ethics for Pharmacists, 156, 410–411

Cognitive apprenticeship, 113–116

content of, 113, 114

dimensions of, 114

method for, 113, 114

sequence in, 113, 114

sociology of, 114, 115

Cognitive apprenticeship methods articulation, 115

coaching, 115

exploration, 115

modeling, 115

reflection, 115

scaffolding, 115

Cognitive learning, 110–111, 112

education methods for, 112

hierarchy of, 111

Cognitive opportunities, 285

Collaborative care agreements, 21

Collaborative practice agreements, 129

College invitations, 284

Colorado, preceptor requirements set by school of pharmacy, 204

Commission on Certification in Geriatric Pharmacy, 332

Communication, 5, 240

nonverbal, 44, 45

paraverbal, 44, 45

verbal, 44, 45

written, 45

Communication skills interpersonal, 43–44

noise, barriers in, 44

transactional model of, 43–44

Communicator, 43

Community health centers, 232

Community health workers, 232

Community involvement, 272–274

case example of, 273–274

Community pharmacy, 321–322

Community service education, 12, 22

Community service organizations, 23–24

Competencies, 178–179

Competency assessment, 118, 120

gauging, 34–35

Complementary and Integrative Medicine, 236–237

Computer-based processes, 145

Consulting pharmacy, 324–325

Continuing education, 284, 332

Continuing professional development (CPD), 14–15, 116–118

apply, 116

evaluate, 116

learn, 116

plan, 116

record and review, 117, 118

reflect, 116

tool example for, 119

Continuous quality improvement (CQI), 161–162, 167, 286

what school requires for, 162–163

Contract, 282

sample student, 283

Contract research organizations, 326

Coping skills, 371

Corporate health systems, administration of, 177

Council on Credentialing in Pharmacy, 3

Covey, Stephen, 172

Credentialing, 330–331

process of, 331–332

of student to site, 29–30

Credentials, additional, 328–329

Cultural competence case examples of, 238

continuing learning process for, 237–239

Cultural competency, 233, 235–236

assessing, 233–236

Cultural differences, 405–406

Cultural sensitivity, 5, 237

Culturally and Linguistically Appropriate Services Standards (CLAS), 225, 230

standards, 236

Culture, 223, 224

Curriculum vitae, 351

D

Data analytics, 177

Decision-making, ethical, 413–415

Deming Cycle, 163

Depression, medical errors and, 362–363

Developmental disabilities, 246

Direct instruction, 65, 344–345

Disabilities resources, 247

Disability Characteristics of Income-Based Government Assistance Recipients (2011), 247

Disability Employment Tabulation 2008–2010, 247

Disability statistics, 245

population distribution, 245–246

Disabled patient care, 245–247

District of Columbia, Oath of Preceptor, 204

Diverse student populations, 395–397

Diversity, language of, 224–225

Document literacy, 247

Dress code policies, 387

Drug company patient assistance Internet sites, 229

Drug information access, 284

Drug Information Handbook, 145

Drug pricing, 177

Drug utilization review, 284, 325

Duffy, Kathleen, 77

E

Eckel, Fred, 317

Educational affiliation agreements, 297–303

Educational newsletters, 284

Educator, 5

Effect, 43

Elaboration description of, 423

evidence for, impact on, 423

experiential education/rotations and, 423

Electronic health record, 314

Electronic medical record, student access to, 33

Emergency code process, 33

Emotional benefits, 285

Emotional intelligence relationship management, 105, 106

self-awareness, 105, 106

self-management, 105, 106

social awareness, 105, 106

Employee benefit counseling, 325–326

Ende, Jack, 425

English as foreign language, 404–406

English as second language, 404–406

Entrepreneurship, 6

Entrustability, levels of, 196

Entrustable professional activities (EPAs), 120, 121–122, 195–197

Entrustment decision, 120

Epoetin, 239

Ethical decision-making framework for, 413

patient case for, 414–415

Ethics, 409–410

combined with law courses, 410

as independent courses, 410

as integrated courses, 410

pharmacist-direct care and, 413–414

Ethics principles autonomy, 412

beneficence, 412

fidelity, 412–413

justice, 412

nonmaleficience, 412

Ethnicity, 224

Evaluation, 76

of experiential program, 160–161

final, 83

Evaluation instruments, 148–149

Evaluation steps analyzing retrieved observations, 148

evaluation instrument completion, 148–149

observing students, 148

recording observations, 148

retrieving recorded observations, 148

Examination oral, 147–148

practical, 148

written, 147

Experiential education, 2, 101–103

behaviors and, 383–384

emotional intelligence and, 104–105

individualized teaching in, 103–107

leadership strength domains for, 107

learning strategies for, 110–111

learning styles and, 104

practice, principles of, 102

standards impacting, 3–6

teaching fundamentals for, 127

Experiential program assessment sources for, 163–164

common elements of, 186

continuous quality improvement in, 161

curriculum design for, 154–156

development of, 154

effective orientation process for, 156–157

evaluation of, 160–161

guidelines for involving others in, 166

involvement of others in, 159–160

involvement of pharmacy staff in, 164–167

orientation for, 156–158

program manual for, 156

sample components of manual for, 156–157

Exploration, 115

F

Facebook, 266, 267

Facilitating, 65, 345

Facility tour, 33

Faculty agreement, co-funded, 288, 289–290

Faculty committee involvement, 285

Faculty preceptors, 294–295

Failing students, 308

Failure to fail, 77–78

Faith role in healthcare, 239–240

Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act, 299

Family role in healthcare, 239–240

Federally qualified health centers, 232

Feedback, 46, 76, 149

description of, 425

evidence for, impact on, 425–426

experiential education/rotations and, 426

general vs. specific, 153

generational view of, 62

ideas for, 76

as motivator, 77

negative, 77

from other health professionals, 164

for patients, 164

positive, 77

Praise and Polish Pendulum, 426, 427

from preceptor to college or school, 286

from school, 163

from student, 163

withholding, 77

Fellowship, 328, 343–344

credentials, 333–334

layered learning and, 343–344

preceptor characteristics for, 350

resources for, 329

Finance, administration of, 175–176

Financial counseling services, 229

Financial incentives, support, 284

Flavell, John, 428

Flesch reading ease score, 252

Flesch-Kincaid grade level score, 252

Flourishing, 360

Flow, 360, 366

Food and Drug Administration (FDA), 325, 326

Formal evaluation, 304–305

Formulary management, 175

G

Gay, 243

Gender dysphoria, 243

Gender neutral, 243

Generation X, 397

characteristics of, 398

Generation Z, 42–43, 62–63, 397, 406

characteristics of, 398

Generational differences, 39–41, 397–399

Generational traits, 40

Getting Things Done, 172

Gilbert, Diaz, 405

Glossary of Education Reform, 161

Government pharmacy, 325

Grant writing support, 284

Gratitude, 360, 366

Group purchasing organizations, 326

Growth mindset, 360, 364–365

H

Habits of Preceptors Rubric, 64

Harassment, 384–385

Health and wellness promotion, 5

Health disparities, 225–227

examples in subpopulations, 228

Health homes, 232

Health inequalities, 225–227

Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA), 206, 266, 386

Health literacy, 247–248

assessment of, 249–250

assessment tools for, 250–251

effective communication to enhance, 251–252

good skills for, 253

individual, system factors in, 248

intervention in, 251

levels of, 249

poorer outcomes and, 249

Health Resources and Services Administration 340B drug pricing program, 177

Healthcare access racial inequality and, 230

socioeconomic inequality and, 230

Healthcare information technology, 326–327

Healthcare professional involvement, 159–160

Health-system pharmacy, 319–320

specialization areas in, 320

HealthyPeople 2030, 226

goals for, 226

Heteronormativity, 243

Hidden curriculum, 73

Hippocrates, 2

Hippocratic Oath, 2

Hispanics, 235

Home infusion pharmacy, 323–324

Houston Methodist Hospital, 189–190

acute care cardiology example from, 190

drug information service rotation in, 191

rotation experiences of, 190

I

Imposter syndrome, preventive strategies for, 363–366

Inappropriate behavior, 383, 384, 387–388

case scenario for, 388–389

preceptor best practices for, 390

resources for, 390–391

Indian Health Service, 325

Information master, 78

In-kind gifts, 284

Innovation, 6

Instagram, 266

Institute for Safe Medication Practices, 251

Institute of Medicine, 320

health disparities and, 225–226

Health Professionals Education and, 4, 6

Quality Chasm Series of, 6

Institutional review board, 186

Insurance plan benefit programs, 314

Integrative health care, 237

Intellectual candor, 377

Interleaved practice description of, 421

evidence for, impact on, 421–422

experiential education/rotations in, 422

Intermediate practice experiences, 131–132

International Pharmaceutical Federation, 325

APPE and, 134

International Pharmaceutical Students, 134

Internships, competitive, 141

Interpersonal skills, 48

APPE and, 138–139

Interpreter, 236

Interprofessional Collaborative, 265

Interprofessional education, 6, 205

experiential requirements by state, 210–219

Interprofessional team, 132

leader, 78

Intersex, 243

Intervention for struggling students, 371

case example of, 370–371

Introductory pharmacy practice experiences (IPPEs), 2, 52

classroom/laboratory simulation and, 132

community and, 132

curriculum for, 4

developing, 154–155

direct patient care experience and, 132

evening, night shift opportunities for, 288

experiences of, 127–130

experiential education hours for, 204, 287

experiential education standards for, 101

experiential requirements, by state, 210–219

fundamental skills learned during, 129

institutional health-system and, 132

transitions of care and, 256

J

Job termination discovery, 97–98

evaluation, 98

recovery, 97

repurposing, rebuilding and, 98

Joint Commission, The, 331

affiliation agreements and, 28

roadmap for patient, family care across cultures and, 257

Joint Commission of Pharmacy Practitioners, 50

vision statement of, 3

K

Kentucky, preceptor written request, 204

Klann, Gene, 73

Kleinman’s Questions, 238–239

L

Laboratory staff, learner education responsibilities, 165

Layered learning fellowships and, 343–344

patient care impact of, 192

practice model, 172, 186–190

team member activities in, 344

telehealth and, 194–195

Leadership, 6

continuum, 55–57

experience, 169–170

management and, 55

principles, 171–172

skills, 54–58

Leadership activities communication, 180

crises, 180

strategic planning, 180

without the title, 180

LEAN methodology, 179

LEARN model, 254, 255

Learner auditory, 141, 142

concerns of, 63

development plan for, 431

essentials needed from preceptor by, 68

expectations for, 348

expectations of, 293–294

failure to fail and, 77–78

feedback process for, 291

final evaluation of, 83

ideal learning environment for, 66

ideal preceptor for, 62

interaction with, 65

kinesthetic, 141, 142

levels of, 345–346

as pharmacist extenders, 185–186

professional activities for, 78

resilience and, 78–79

supervision levels for, 121

teams of, 186

template for, 75

types of, 141

visual, 141, 142

Learner challenges attention to academic program, 151

attitude, 150

comprehension, 151

failing, 154

motivation, 150–151

practice setting, 151–152

strategies for dealing with, 152–153

unprofessional conduct, 150–151

Learner evaluation, 146

formative, 146

praise and reprimand, 145, 146

summative, 146–148

Learner relationship, 61

fostering before learner arrives, 68–70

Learner-centered teaching, 64–65

Learning Bloom’s domains of, 110–113

metacognition and, 141–142

near-peer assisted, 109–110

passive, 309

peer-assisted, 109–110

problem-solving, 309

small group, 309

tools for, 145–146

Learning disabilities, 246

Learning environment, 65–66

integrative patient care, 67

practice-based research, 67–68

supportive physical, 66–67

vibrant, 66

Learning pyramid, 344

coaching, 345

direct instruction, 344–345

facilitating, 345

modeling, 345

Learning stages, 107

conscious competent, 108, 109

conscious incompetent, 108, 109

unconscious competent, 108, 109

unconscious incompetent, 108, 109

Learning strategies activating prior knowledge, 419–420

elaboration, 423

feedback, 425–427

focused facts, 418–419

interleaved practice, 421–422

metacognitive training, 428–429

myths of, 417–418

peer assisted learning, 424–425

personalization, 429–432

scaffolding, 428–429

spacing, 422–423

testing, retrieval, 420–421

Learning styles, 64, 104

accommodator, 104, 105

assimilator, 104, 105

converger, 104, 105

diverger, 104, 105

Lesbian, 243

Letter of intent, 351

LGBTQ population care, background on, 241

case studies of, 244

cultural competent care and, 242

demographics of, 241

organizational support and, 242

patient-centered care barriers for, 241–242

pharmacists and pharmacy students actions in, 243

students from, 401–403

terms and definitions for, 243

transgender subpopulation care in, 242–243

Liability issues, 205–206

Licensure, 202–203

Life purpose, 360

Lifelong educational habits, 116–118

Lifelong learning, 12

Likert scale, 250

example of, 36

Limited English proficiency, 225, 236

Listening skills, 46

Longitudinal experiential training, 186, 190–191

M

Make It Stick, 421

Managed care pharmacy, 322–323

Management competencies, 172

learner education responsibilities, 165

skills, 170–171

Manasse, Henri, 2

Maslach Burnout Inventory Human Services Survey, 361

Match, 355

Mayo Clinic, 362

Medicaid, 229, 231, 325

patient-centered medical home and, 232

Medical homes, 232, 327

Medical information group, 324

Medical marketing, communication organizations, 326

Medicare, 229

Part A, 231

Part B, 231

Part C, 231

Part D, 231

patient-centered medical home and, 232

Medication therapy management (MTM), 193, 228

expansion of, 285

Medications current, 285

reconciliation of, 249

Medication-use systems management, 5

Memorandum of understanding, 28, 29, 299

template for, 300–302

Mentee, 99

career goals of, 95

characteristics, responsibilities of, 98–99

hitting rock-bottom, 94–95

negative preceptor experience by, 95–96

ready to resign, 94

Mentor, 87, 88

as advisor, 89

characteristics, responsibilities of, 98–99

considerations in choosing, 93

as guide, 89

as role model, 89–90

ways to find, 92–93

Mentoring, 1, 13, 316–317

benefits of, 90

handing off, 94

handling mentee hitting rock-bottom, 94–95

job termination and, 97–98

mentee career goals and, 95

mentee negative preceptor experience and, 95–96

pitfalls, challenges of, 90–91

professional staff, 96–97

relationship, 3

right after residency, 96

of seasoned professionals, 97

when mentee is ready to resign, 94

Mentorship, 88

advice, 92–93

change factors for, 91–92

contemporary methods of, 91–92

pearls, 98

Message encoding, decoding 43–44

miscommunication of, 44

Metacognition, 141–142

knowledge and, 142

regulation and, 142

Metacognitive training description of, 428

evidence for, impact on, 428

experiential education/rotations and, 428

Millenial generation, 40–41, 62, 397, 406

characteristics of, 398

engaging, 41–42

positive reinforcement and, 41, 42

team building and, 41

technology and, 40–41

working with, 399

Mindfulness, 360, 365

Mindset, struggling student, 371

Miscommunication, 44

Misconduct, 383, 384, 386–387

case scenario for, 389–390

preceptor best practices for, 390

resources for, 390–391

Mission statement, 79–80

Modeling, 65, 115, 345

well-being, 376–377

Molloy, Elizabeth, 377

Morality, 412–413

Multiple races, 234

Multistate Pharmacy Jurisprudence Examination, 6

Murthy, Vivek, 359–360

Myers-Briggs Type Indicator, 31

N

National Academy of Medicine, 360

National Assessment of Adult Literacy, 248

National Association of Boards of Pharmacy, 6

License Examination, 330

National Association of Chain Drug Stores, rotations, 141

National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health, 236–237

National Center for Cultural Competence, 233

National Center for Educational Statistics, nontraditional students, 399

National Commission for Certifying Agencies, 332

National Committee for Quality Assurance, 331

National Drug Code, 177

National Matching Services, Inc., 355

National Transitions of Care Coalition, 253–254

Native Hawaiian, 234, 235

Near-peer assisted learning (nPAL), 109–110

Networking, 285, 287

Noise, 44

Nonnative speaking, 404–406

Nonpharmacy personnel, 146–147

Nontraditional students, 399–400

Nonverbal communication clusters, 44, 45

congruence, 44, 45

context, 44, 45

North American Pharmacist Licensure Examination (NAPLEX), 6

Numeracy, 247, 248

Nursing, 165

Nursing and Midwifery Council, 77

O

Oath of a Pharmacist, 156, 264, 411

Office of Management and Budget, 234

Ohio, preceptor requirements, 204

Oklahoma, preceptor examination, 204

Onboarding, 27–28

affiliation agreements and, 28–29

checklist for, 28

competency assessment and, 34–35

credentialing of students to site, 29–30

employees and, 32

evaluation of, 35–36

information exchanges and, 30–31

learner’s first days on site, 32

medication safety and, 32

ongoing, 32–34

orientation to, 33

patient and, 32

preparing for, 28

preparing learner for, 31

preparing preceptor for, 31

Oregon, non-pharmacist preceptors, 204

Orientation, 70–71

checklist sample for, 157–158

conducting effective, 156–157

expectations description for, 72–73

learner responsibilities and, 72

mutual goals in, 72

roles in, 71–72

P

Pacific Islander, 234, 235

Pansexual, 243

Paperwork, regulatory, 33

Parish, Edward, 2

Partnership, 279–280

academic institutions benefits of, 294

agreements, school perspective on, 292

college, school benefits of, 296–297

educational, competence benefits of, 295–296

establishing, 280–282

expectations for, 292–294

financial, resource benefits of, 295

maintaining, 286–287

personal, professional advancement in, 296

preceptor benefits of, 282, 284

school maintaining, 291–292

school perspective of, 287–290

school perspective on preceptor development in, 290–281

site benefits of, 294

Passive learning, 309

Patient advocacy, 5

care provider, 78

confidentiality, 206

involvement of, 159–160

learner education responsibilities to, 165

satisfaction, administration of, 176–177

Patient/family resources, 229

Patient-centered care, 5

medical home, 232

Peer assessment, 163

Peer-assisted learning (PAL), 109–110

description of, 424

evidence for, impact on, 424

experiential education/rotation and, 424–425

Performance improvement programs, 284

Performance management strategies, 195–196

Person-activity fit diagnostic, 368–369

Personal experience, 12–13

Personal space, 240

Personalization description of, 429

evidence for, impact on, 430

experiential education/rotations, 430, 432

Pharmaceutical, healthcare distributors, 326

Pharmaceutical industry, 324

Pharmacist demographics past half century, 396

learner education responsibilities and, 165

Pharmacist Inventory of Learning Styles (PILS), 104, 105

Pharmacist’s Patient Care Process, 50, 225, 230–231

Pharmacist-Extenders, 187, 191–192, 195

Pharmacy business of, 174

education, 2

evolution of, 285

information systems for, 177–178

organizations, 178

as second career, 399–400

Pharmacy administration elective rotations in, 170

experience in, 169–170

Pharmacy benefit manager, 322, 325

Pharmacy graduates information master domains for, 5, 6

interprofessional team member domains for, 5

patient care provider domains for, 4, 5

population health promoter domains for, 5

practice manager domains for, 5

self-developer domains for, 5

Pharmacy practice advancement, 178

Pharmacy Practice Model Initiative (2010), 183

Pharmacy practice models, 173

Pharmacy program experiential requirements for, 204–205

preceptor requirements for, 441

Pharmacy rotation orientation to, 18–20

schedule building in, 21–22

service learning environment examples of, 22

service learning questions, assignments in, 22

service learning topics examples in, 22

student experiences, goals in, 20

Pharmacy staff involvement, 159–160

Pharmacy technicians, learner education responsibilities, 165

Physicians, learner education responsibilities, 165

Plagiarism, 385–386

Plan Do Check Act (PDCA) model, 163

Pledge of Professionalism, 156

Policies and procedures, 33, 179

Population health promoter, 78

Population-based care, 5

Portfolios, 18

Positive psychology, 360, 364

Postgraduate year 1 (PGY1), 2, 345–346

learning level of, 346–347

levels of, 342

programs for, 139

residency training, 328–329

residents, preceptor characteristics in, 350

Postgraduate year 2 (PGY2) learning level of, 346–347

levels of, 342

programs, 139

residency training, 328–329

residents, preceptor characteristics in, 350

Practice Advancement Initiative, 183

pillars of, 184

Practice manager, 78

Practice models, 15–16

institutional audits, evaluations in, 17

layered learning in, 17, 186–190

library references, resources for, 17

medical record documentation in, 17–18

professional meetings, committee attendance and, 17

publishing results of, 16–17

student feedback in, 18

student meetings, workshops and, 17

Precepting, 1

accountability and, 14

duty of, 13–14

experimenting with new ideas and, 15

mutual benefit and, 14

origins of, 1–2

partnership of, 2–3

practice models for, 15–18

Precepting skills, 39

questioning, listening, 45–46

Preceptor application for, 203

certification of, 202, 203

benefits of, 286

career planning and, 315–316

characteristics of, 7–8

core values of, 12–14

development of, 282, 284

effective teaching opportunities for, 11–12

feedback, assessment of students and, 22–23

importance of, 7

intangible benefits of, 285

learner education responsibilities and, 164

legal standing of, 203

length of practice and, 203

licensure of, 202–203

mentoring and, 13

personal experience sharing by, 12–13

practice are expertise of, 13

professionalism of, 12

promotion of learning and, 12

qualities of effective, 61–62

requirements of, 348–350

residents as, 139–140

respect for others and, 13

school’s expectations for, 292–293

similarities between student and resident and, 443

student diversity and, 13

tangible benefits of, 284–285

time commitment of, 13

training seminar for, 203

traits of effective, 64

Preceptor skills, 39

assessment and, 50–52

communication and, 43–45

interpersonal, 48–50

leadership and, 54–58

questioning, listening, 45–46

teaching and, 52–54

written communication and, 46–48

Preceptor-college relationship establishing expectations for, 306–307

feedback and, 305–306

learner performance evaluations, 307

Preceptorship, 88

Preceptors-in-training, 348

Prior knowledge description of, 419

evidence for, impact of, 419

experiential education/rotations application of, 419–420

Problem learners small group teaching for, 309

working with, 307–308

Problem solving, 5, 143–144

case scenarios for, 145

learning style, 309

triad, 143, 144

Profession, 263

Professional, 263

Professional associations/organizations/societies/fraternities, 23–24, 274–276, 325

Professionalism, 6, 12, 263–264

assessment rubrics for, 265

case example for, 270–271

contract for, 390, 392–393

lapses in, 268–272

schools and, 265

social media and, 265–268

Professionalization, 263

Prose literacy, 247

Psychomotor learning, education methods for, 112

Public Health Service, 325

Purchasing administration of, 175

value-based, 176–177

Q

Quality assurance, 331

Quality improvement, 179, 331

programs, 284

Queer, 243

Questions closed-ended, 45, 46

leading, 46

open-ended, 46

probing, 46

reflective, 74

R

Race, 224

Racial inequality, 230

Readability statistics, 252

Recognition, 285

Reference letter, 350–351

Reflection, 115

Religion, 239, 403–404

Religious dietary restrictions, 239

Religious holidays, 404

case scenario for, 406

Research, 324

support, 284

Residency, 328

accreditation of, 340–341

case scenario for, 349

making students work in, 184–185

memorandums of understanding for, 299–303

precepting, 3

resources for, 329

struggling students and, 371

value of, 341

Residency application process first, second professional years, 352

fourth professional year, 352–353

Match, 355

third professional year, 352

Residency process advising students, 350–351

resources for, 351–352

Residency teaching experience, 139–140

Residency training case scenario for, 356

growth of, 339–340

importance of, 339

levels of, 342–343

misconduct, inappropriate behaviors and, 384

Resident evaluation of, 149

as preceptor, 139–140

Resilience, 78–79, 359–360, 364

focal point and, 79

case example of, 367–370

Resources, 64

Retail pharmacy operations, 174

Role modeling, 73–74

Rotation, 6–7

career advising and, 314–315

case scenario for, 347

community service education in, 12

elective, 140

feedback and, 304

lifelong learning and, 12

organization, time management in, 10–11

orientation checklist for, 70–71

in pharmacy administration, 180–181

pharmacy school requirements for, 140

preceptor and, 11–12

standards, expectations of, 9–10

traumatic experiences and, 375–376

Rotation structure feedback, 9

learn by doing, 8–9

mutual benefit, 9

orientation, 8

Rubric, 41–42

analytic, 42

analytic example of, 52

checklist for, 42

descriptive, 42

holistic, 42

rating scale for, 42

S

Safety program, 33

Saint Luke’s Health System of Kansas City, 187–188, 189

education team charter of, 200

student satisfaction survey of, 199

Saint-Exupéry, Antoine de, 169

Sargeant, Joan, 74

Scaffolding, 115

description of, 428–429

evidence for, impact on, 429

experiential education/rotations for, 429

Scholarship activities, 23

Schön, DA, 75

Scott, Steven, 363

SCPE Standards 2016, 438

Second-victim syndrome, 374–375

Security badges, 33

Self-awareness, 6

Self-compassion, 360, 365

Self-determination, 364

Self-reflection, fostering, 74–75

Semantics, 45

Sequential experiential training, 186

Service learning. see Pharmacy rotation

Seven Habits of Highly Efficient People, 172

Sexual harassment, 384–385

Shared salary, 288

agreement sample for, 289–290

Silent generation, 397

characteristics of, 398

SinfoniaRx, 194–195

Site evaluation, 290

periodic quality assurance, 290

preceptor and feedback, 290–291

Situation background assessment and recommendation (SBAR) approach, 179

Six Sigma, 163, 179

Skype, 266

Small group learning, 309

SMART goals, 116

Snapchat, 266

SOAP, 194

Social assessment, 230–231

Social connectedness, 360, 364

Social determinants of health, 226–227

case example of, 227

Social media appropriate use of, 267

inappropriate use of, 265–267

recommendations for, 267–268

Social Security Administration, 229

Social Security Disability Income, 229

Socioeconomic inequality, 230

Socioeconomic status, medication use and, 228

Spacing strategy description of, 422

evidence for, impact on, 422

experiential education/rotation for, 422–423

Specialty pharmacy, 174–175, 323

complicated disease states and, 323

Specialties, recognized, 333

Sponsorship, 88

Staff introductions, 33

State board of pharmacy preceptor certification, 202

preceptor requirements, 201–203, 207–208

ratio of preceptors to interns, 202

State pharmacy organizations, APPE, 134

Stereotype, 224

Sterile products, administration of, 173

Strategic planning, administration of, 176

Strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats (SWOT) analysis, 178

Stressful situations, 373

case example of, 373–374

Struggling student behaviors to watch for, 371–372

second-victim syndrome and, 374–375

stressful situations and, 373–374

Strunk and White The Elements of Style, 47

Student Pharmacist Practice Model, 158

potential duties, responsibilities of, 158–159

Student satisfaction survey, 199

Subjective, objective, assessment and plan (SOAP), 42

Summative evaluation, 146–148, 149

examination, 147

timing of, 147

Supply chain, administration of, 175

Support, 240

Swiss National Science Foundation, 362

System Pharmacy Education Team, 187

T

Teaching facts, 418–419

logic-based method to, 142–144

myths, 417–418

skills, 52–54

style, 64–65

tools, 145–146

Telehealth, layered learning in, 194

Testing, retrieval strategy description of, 420

evidence for, impact of, 420–421

experiential education/rotation, 421

Texas, ASHP-accredited residency and, 204

The Quadruple Aim, 363

The Triple Aim, 363

Title IX harassment, 384–385

Title VII, 403

To Err Is Human, 320

Topic discussions discussion phase of, 82

facilitating, 80

phases for, 81

planning phase of, 80–81

post-discussion phase of, 82–83

Total Quality Management, 163

Traditionalism generation, 397

characteristics of, 398

Training programs, 303

preparation for, 303–304

rotation feedback and, 304

school’s formal evaluation of, 304–305

Transgender care, 242–243

Transitions of care, 253–257

case example of, 254

managing criteria for, 257

Traumatic brain injury patient, 246–247

Traumatic experience accident and chaos response to, 375

emotional first aid for, 375

enduring inquisition and, 375

intrusive reflections and, 375

moving on, 375–376

moving past, 375–376

restoring personal integrity after, 375

Treatment modalities, 285

Tugend, Alina, 76

Twitter, 266

U

U.S. Bureau of the Census: Population Estimates Program, 234, 245

U.S. Department of Education, National Center for Education Statistics, 248

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 226

U.S. Public Health Service, APPE, 134

Unauthorized collaboration/collusion, 385

Underinsured patient, 231–232

Uninsured patient, 231–232

United States Pharmacopeia APPE and, 134

Chapter <795> documentation compliance, 179

Chapter <797>, 173

Chapter <797> documentation compliance, 179

Chapter <800> documentation compliance, 179

prescription labeling and, 251

University of Missouri, Division of Inclusion, Diversity and Equity, 403

University of North Carolina, 317

University of Texas at Austin College of Pharmacy, 150, 151

University of Washington, 361

Unprofessional conduct, 150–151

Unprofessional dress, 387

V

Veterans, 400–401

Veterans Health Administration, 325

W

Wayne State University College of Pharmacy, 185

Websites, 146

Well-being, 359–360, 363

case example for, 367–370

preceptor and, 376–377

preventive strategies and, 363–366

Wendover, Robert, 399

Western University of Health Sciences, 193–194

White, 234

White Coat Ceremony, 264

Work internships, 131–132

Workshops, 330

World Health Organization, 226–227

Written communication, 46–48

tone tips for, 45

Y

YouTube, 266

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